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Ilinskiy Vladimir V.

Russian version

Professor

Chair of Hydrobiolology,

Biological Department Mos#mce_temp_url#cow State

Lomonosov University, Vorob'evi gori, Moscow, 119899, Russia.

Communication (Administrative):

Phone : (095) 939-25-73

E-mail: Этот e-mail адрес защищен от спам-ботов, для его просмотра у Вас должен быть включен Javascript

Qualification:

D.Sc. in Hydrobiology, Moscow State Lomonosov University, 2000.

D.Sc. Thesis Title: Heterotrophic bacterioplankton: ecology and role in the natural purification processes from oil pollution.

Ph.D. in Microbiology Moscow State Lomonosov Univer-sity, 1979.

Ph.D. Thesis Title:

Ecology of hydrocarbon-oxidizing marine bacteria.

B.Sc. in Soil Microbiology, Moscow State Lomonosov Uni-versity, 1973.

 

Professional Experience:

1994 - till present

Senior Science, Chair of Hydrobiology, Biological Dept. Moscow State Lomonosov University.

1985 - 1994

Research Fellow, Chair of Hydrobiology, Biological Dept.

1979 - 1985

Junior Research Fellow, Chair of Plant Physiology, Biological Dept. Moscow State Lomonosov University.

1975 - 1978

Graduate Student, Chair of Microbiology Biological Dept. Moscow State Lomonosov University.

1973 - 1975

Research Assistant, State Oceanographic Institute, Moscow.

 

Expeditions

Microbiological analyses

Duration (month)

Date

Caspian Sea,
research vessels

Total bacteria, Viable bacteria

4

1973-1974

Baltic Sea,
research vessels

" - "

6

1975, 1981-1981

Commandore Islands
(Far East of Russia), field's base

" - "

3

1975

Pacific ocean,
research vessels

" - "

3

1977

Severnaya Zemlya, (Central Arctic),
polar station and drifting ice

Oil biodegradation in situ, total bacteria, viable bacteria

11

1983-1984

Kara Sea,
field's base

Hydrocarbon-oxidizing activity in situ

3

1987

South Shetland Island,
Bellingshausen station (Russia)
Arztowski station (Poland),
field's bases and research vessels

Hydrocarbon-oxidizing activity in situ, total and viable bacteria

12

1988-1989

White Sea,
пcoastal ice and research vessels

Hydrocarbon-oxidizing activity in situ

3

1992-1993

Mojaiskoe reservoir
(drinking water supply observations of Moscow), field base

Hydrocarbon-oxidizing activity in situ, total and viable bacteria, oil biodegradation in situ

all year observations 1994 - till present

 

Basic microbiological methods for field's works:

  • Aseptic water sampling from the surface microlayer (with using original screen) and underlaying water (Zoobell sampler).
  • Aseptic water and ice sampling directly from the ice cover with using Morev's drill and special samplers.
  • Epifluorescence microscopy with DAPI or acridine orange for total bacteria count in water and sediment samples.
  • Viable count with using of solid and liquid nutrient media for eutrophic (co-piotrophic), oligotrophic and hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria.
  • Laboratory procedures with hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria: pure culture isola-tion, oil biodegradation activities measurements, biochemical and physiologi-cal investigations.
  • Potential heterotrophic activity measurements in aquatic and sediment envi-ronments under in situ temperatures with using of labeled organic substrates on the basis of modified methods.
  • Classification and characterization of heterotrophic microbial communities on the basis of community carbon source utilization pattern.
  • Floating tubes techniques for oil biodegradation monitoring in situ without pol-lution of water body.
  • Semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) technique for monitoring and as-sessing trace levels of organic contaminants in aquatic and soil environments.

 

Current Research Interests:

  • Ecology of aquatic heterotrophic bacteria with special attention to wintertime and Po-lar Regions;
  • Hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria: ecology, in situ activity and practical using for oil biodegradation acceleration;
  • Comparative heterotrophic activities of bacterioneuston and bacterioplankton;
  • Microbiology of reservoirs;
  • Microbiology of springs;
  • Methods development.

 

Awards:
1993 - Soros Foundation, One-Year Individual Research Grant
1995 - Soros Foundation, One-Year Group Research Grant
1997-1998 - Soros Foundation, Two-Years Individual Research Grant (Open Society Research Support Scheme, OSI/HESP, grant no. 220/1996).

 

Knowledge of languages:
English - basic;
German - initial.

 

List of selected publications (total - 62):

  1. Il'inskii V.V., Semenenko M.N. Il'inskii V.V., Semenenko M.N. 2002. Oil bio-degradation in the Arctic marine polluted environments: comparative seasonal study. Arctic Forum 2001. The Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S. (ARCUS), Fairbanks, AK. 2002. 84 pp. P. 39.
  2. Il'inskii V.V. 2000. Heterotrophic bacterioplankton: ecology and role in the natural purification processes from oil pollution. 2000. Thesis of D.Sc. dissertation, 53 pp.
  3. Il'inskii V.V. 2000. Hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria in the coastal waters of ant-arctic island King George: number and activity from February to March // Water organisms and ecosystem. Proc. scientific conference. Moscow, Dialog-MSU Publishing house. P. 28.
  4. Il'inskii V.V. 2000 Bacterioplankton of coastal and offshore waters of Ardly Bay and adjacent areas (King George Island, Antarctica): composition and number dynamic from March to October // Problems of microbial ecology and physiology. Proc. of scientific conference. Moscow, Dialog-MSU Publishing House. P. 63.
  5. Il'inskii V.V., Komarova T.I., Koronelli T.V., Lisichkin G.V., Serdan A.A. 1998. Sorbent for elimination of oil products from the water surface // InCom'98. Interna-tional Symposium on instrumentalized analytical chemistry and computer technology. Dusseldorf (Germany, 1998). P. 323.
  6. Il'inskii V.V., Porshneva O.V., Semenenko M.N. 1998. Hydrocarbon-oxidizing microorganisms in coastal and open waters of the Mozhaiskoe Reservoir: activity and contribution to the processes of natural purification in summer. Vodnye Resursy, Vol. 25, No 3, pp. 335-338.
  7. Il'inskii V.V., Porshneva O.V., Komarova T.I., Koronelli T.V. 1998 The effect of petroleum hydrocarbons on the hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteriocenosis in the southern part of Mozhaiskoe water storage basin. Microbiologiya, Vol. 67, No 2, pp. 220-225.
  8. Koronelli T.V., Komarova T.I., Il'inskii V.V., Kuzmin Y.I., Kirsanov N.B., Janenko A.C. 1997. Introduction of bacteria of the genus Rhodococcus into oil-contaminated tundra soil. Prikladnaya Biohimiya i Microbiologiya, Vol. 33, No 2, pp. 198-201.
  9. Il'inskii V.V. Bacterio- and phytoplankton dynamic in relation with environ-mental parameters in Ardley Bay, King George Island, Antarctica (a long time natural observations). 31-st European Marine Biology Symposium Programme and Abstracts. St. Petersburg, 1996. P. 55.
  10. Belyaeva A.N., Gorshkov A.N., Shelagina I.A., Il'inskii V.V. 1996. Origin and composition of alkanes in snow, ice and sea water in the vicinity of King George Island. Oceanologia, vol. 36, No 3, pp. 394-400.
  11. Il'inskii V.V. 1995. Bacterioplankton of the surface water layer in the Central Arctic region in spring. Microbiologiya, Vol. 64, No 5, pp. 593-600.
  12. Il'inskii V.V., Semenenko M.N. 1994. Accelerated radioisotopic method for the activity of microorganisms measurement in natural waters. Microbiologyia, Vol. 63, No 5, pp. 520-522.
  13. Koronelli T.V., Dermicheva S.G., Il'inskii V.V., Komarova T.I., Porshneva O.V. 1994. The taxonomic structure of hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteriocenoses of water ecosystems in various climatic zones. Microbiologiya, Vol. 63, No 5, pp. 516-519.
  14. Koronelli T.V., Komarova T.I., Yuferova S.G., Il'inskii V.V., Chivkunova O.B. 1993. Polar lipids of hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria. Microbiologiya, 1993, Vol. 62. No 2, pp. 153-157.
  15. Koronelli T.V., Il'inskii V.V., Semenenko M.N. 1993. Oil pollution and marine ecosystems stability. Ecologiya (Vladivostok), No. 4, pp. 78-81.
  16. Il'inskii V.V., Izmailov V.V. 1992. Self-purification processes of arctic water and ice from oil pollution and role of microorganisms: all year cycle of the natural ob-servations. Trudi Gosudarstvennogo Okeanograficheskogo Instituta, Vol. 23, pp. 91-101.
  17. Maksimov V.N., Il'inskaiya G.K., Il'inskii V.V. 1992. Estimation of oil pollution effect on the pelagic ecosystem ecosystem of Baltic Sea near port Klaipeda with using of multivariate analyses methods. Trudi Gosudarstvennogo Okeanograficheskogo Instituta, Vol. 23, pp. 78-91.
  18. Il'inskii V.V., Semenenko M.N., Yuferova S.G., Troshina N.N., Koronelli T.V. 1991. Nitrogen-phosphate fertilizer for a stimulation of petroleum degradation in sea water. Vestnik Moskovskogo Universiteta, Ser. 16, Biology, No 2, pp. 63-67.
  19. Koronelli T.V., Il'inskii V.V., Janushka V.A. and other (collective monograph). 1990. Tanker "Globe Asimi" wreck in port Klaipeda and its ecological con-siquences/Ed. Simonov A.I. Gidrometeoizdat publishing house. 232 pp.
  20. Koronelli T.V., Il'inskii V.V., Dermicheva S.G., Komarova T.I., Belyayeva A.N., Filippova Z.O., Rozynov B.V. 1989. Hydrocarbon-oxidizing arctic microorganisms. Izvestiya Russian Academy of Science, No. 4, pp.581-587.
  21. Il'inskii V.V., Myatlev V.D., Koronelli T.V. 1988. Effect of hydrochemical pa-rameters on microbial communities of Baltic Sea in relation with oil (mazut) pollu-tion. Ocean Biology, Moscow Society of Naturalists. Moscow, Nauka publishing house, pp. 72-85.
  22. Koronelli T.V., Il'inskii V.V., Yanushka V.A., Krasnikova T.I. 1987. Hydrocar-bon-oxidizing microflora from the water of the Baltic Sea and the Kurshsky Bay polluted by mazut upon oil tanker wreck. Microbiologiya, Vol. 56, No. 3, pp. 383-388.
  23. Gorochov V.K., Yanushka V.A., Il'inskii V.V., Koronelli T.V. 1985. Effect of natural zeolites on oxydation of diesel fuel by bacteria Rhodococcus erythropolis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Vestnik Moskovskogo Universiteta, Ser. 16. Biol-ogy. No. 4, pp. 20-24.
  24. Koronelli T.V., Il'inskii V.V. 1984. About the enumeration of hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria in seawater by MPN method. Vestnik Moskovskogo Univer-siteta, Ser. 16. Biology. No. 3, pp. 54-56.
  25. Il'inskii V.V., Gusev M.V., Koronelli T.V., Ignatchenko A.V. 1983.Bacterioplankton and bacterioneustone in some regions of the north-western part of the Pacific Ocean. Izvestiya Russian Academy of Science. Bio-logical series. No. 1, pp. 70-79.
  26. Gusev M.V., Koronelli T.V., Linkova M.A., Il'inskii V.V. 1982. The Effect of ex-creations and cells biomass of cyanobacteria on hydrocarbon-oxidizing mycobac-teria. Microbiologiya, Vol. 51, No. 1, pp. 138-141.
  27. Il'inskii V.V. 1981. Silica gel medium for selection and account of hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria. Vestnik Moskovskogo Universiteta, Ser. 16. Biology. No. 2, pp. 53-55.
  28. Gusev M.V., Koronelli T.V., Linkova M.A., Il'inskii V.V. 1981. A study of the as-sotiation of a cyanobacterium under the conditions of oil pollution, using the tech-nique of complete factor experiment. Microbiologiya, Vol. 50, No. 6, pp. 1092-1987.
  29. Gusev M.V., Koronelli T.V., Maksimov V.N., Il'inskii V.V., Zaharov V.T. 1980. Microbiological oxidation of diesel fuel study with using the technique of complete factor experiment. Microbiologiya, Vol. 49, No. 1, pp. 19-23.
  30. Il'inskii VV. Ecology of hydrocarbon-oxidizing marine bacteria. 1979. Thesis of Ph. D., Moscow State Lomonosov University, Moscow. 25 pp.
  31. Il'inskii V.V., Gusev M.V., Koronelli T.V. 1979. Hydrocarbon-oxidizing micro-flora of noncontaminated seawaters. Microbiologiya, Vol. 48, No. 2, pp. 279-282.
  32. Il'inskii V.V. 1979. A screen for sterile water sampling from the surface mi-crolayer. Vestnik Moskovskogo Universiteta. Ser. Biology, Soil Science, No. 3, pp. 64-66.

 

Patent (in collaboration with Koronelli T.V., Arakeliyan E., Komarova T.I.).
Method for soil cleaning from oil pollution. Patent N 2019527, (19) RU (11) 2019527(13) C 1 (51) CO2F 3/34, EO2B 15/04, CO9K/17/00. Priority 30.04.1993, Registration date 15.09.1994 (Russian Federation). Il'inskiy Vladimir V. Heterotrophic bacterioplankton: ecology and role in natural purification processess from oil pollution (results from Dr.Sc. dissertation) Total microbial number and abundances of individual heterotrophic bacteria groups (copiotrophic, oligotrophic and hydrocarbon-oxidizing) were estimated based on standard and modified microbiological methods along with their potential hydrocarbon-oxidizing activities. Studies were performed in polar and temperate marine and limnological environments. It was possible to describe microbial communities and to make conclusions about their state (passive or active) during different seasons. The microbial contribution to the natural self-purification processes of aquatic environments from oil pollution was analyzed too. Hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria can be considered to be a normal structural and functional component of bacterioplankton, in both, polluted and non-polluted oil contaminated aquatic environments. Hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria include copiotrophic as well as oligotrophic microorganisms, for this reason hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria number is quantitatively related to the abundance of these two groups of heterotrophic microorganisms and to abiotic environmental factors (temperature, concentrations of biogenic nutrients, seasonal changes). But it does not correlate as a rule with the hydrocarbon concentrations in aquatic ecosystems. Hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria number cannot be used for this reason as a quantitative indicator of oil pollution A modified radiocarbon method is suggested for potential hydrocarbon-oxidizing activity measurements. This permits analyses directly in water samples with short exposure time (not more, then 4 hours) at in situ temperatures and close to ambient hydrocarbons concentrations. Potential rates of hydrocarbon mineralization measured with 14C-octadecane (PRHMoct) at in situ temperatures varied over a wide ranges in marine and freshwater environments: the lowest annual average level (6 ng l 1 h 1) was observed in near shore waters of the Antarctic Island King George and the highest level (119 ng l 1 h 1) - in Mojaiskoe water storage basin, located in a temperate environment. The PRHMoct values depended on a variety of ecological factors, such as water temperature, nature of oil pollution (chronic or accident), and the trophic status of the environment. The microbial contribution to natural purification processes in high Arctic and in Antarctic environments as well in a freshwater storage basin too, were estimated with special attention to hydrological and hydrochemical situation at each site. It was concluded that in polluted Arctic and sub-Arctic marine areas microbial activities are not strong enough for complete oil pollution degradation. Hence, this lead to oil accumulations in the sediments. Thus, oil biodegradation potential can be much higher in temperate unpolluted freshwater environments, but biogenic elements concentrations and temperature are limiting oil biodegradation processes in summer and winter seasons respectively. Oil biodegradation processes activities took place at significant levels below ice in polar marine regions and in the water storage basin. These process rates were only slightly lower in winter than in summer in sub-Arctic polluted environments, but PRHMoct in the unpolluted water storage basin was reduced in winter season by a quotient of six or even more. Alkanes represented the main features of the distribution and their molecular structures were investigated in the seawater samples (1 m depth and a surface microlayer), in fresh water lakes samples, in snow and ice samples collected in Ardley Bay (King George Island) area and in snow and ice samples picked up directly from the central part of island. It was found that terrigenic melt water plays an important role in creation of alkanes pool in the lakes water, whereas seawater contains only a minor quantity of alkanes with terrigenic and technogenic origin. These last two groups of alkanes were probably originated in seawater from allochthonic organic matter transformation processes, which usually take place in any marine environments. Total bacteria number of Antarctic coastal water were found similar to those of open Southern Ocean waters and to some unpolluted temperate environments. Free-living bacteria dominated among total bacteria and the associate (attached) bacteria fraction does not exceed 20%. These two bacteria groups number showed high level of correlation during the all observations time. Average amounts of copiotrophic, oligotrophic and hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria in nearshore waters of King George Island during austral autumn and winter seasons were closely to those of nearshore seawaters of temperate unpolluted environments. Increases in numbers of viable heterotrophic bacteria were observed concomitantly to increases in hydrocarbon-oxidizing activity in austral winter. Surface water enrichments by bio-available organic matter, which resulted from seasonal phytoplankton and macrophytes decay processes, may have been a reason for this phenomenon. Effect of accidental oil pollution on structural and functional characteristics of hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacterial communities of uncontaminated mesotrophic water storage basin were investigated by using specially constructed devices for long-time oil exposition in situ. It could be shown that great taxonomic changes in community composition took place, which resulted in predominant bacterial genera replacements and also in drastic increases (more than in ten times) of viable hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria. Bacterioplankton hydrocarbon-oxidizing activity increased too during this time, but not more than to 30%. The ratio between of the total amount of hydrocarbons (n-alkanes), used by microorganisms for energy and constructive metabolism together, and that used for energy metabolism alone was constant in the freshwater water storage basin environment. This ratio value is 2,81 0,02 (n = 154) and did neither depend on season, nor on oil pollution degree. American microbiologists Atlas and Bartha have observed a similar ratio for oil biodegradation and mineralization processes in marine water samples. Correlations between viable hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria number and hydrocarbon-oxidizing microbial activity at in situ temperature (measured by 14C-hydrocarbons method in the same water sample) were absent in many cases of fresh and seawaters. Therefore, the estimations of the contribution of microorganisms in natural purification processes of waters from oil hydrocarbons, which were made on the basis of the viable hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria number only, are impossible to use. Maximal abundances of copiotrophic, oligotrophic and hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria were not always observed in seawater surface microlayers, as considered earlier. Bacterioneuston hydrocarbon-oxidizing activity did not differ from those of bacterioplankton in a lot of cases and may be even lower. The role of bacterioneuston as a most effective biological participant of natural purification processes of aquatic ecosystems from oil pollution needs to be revised. Bacteria of the genus Rhodococcus frequently isolated from oil polluted and unpolluted marine and freshwater environments showed hydrocarbon-oxidizing acivity. Pseudomonas and Mycobacterium were quite often occurring too, but Acinetobacter and Arthrobacter were relatively rare.

 

Heterotrophic bacterioplankton: ecology and role in natural purification processess from oil pollution (results from Dr.Sc. dissertation)

  1. Total microbial number and abundances of individual heterotrophic bacteria groups (copiotrophic, oligotrophic and hydrocarbon-oxidizing) were estimated based on standard and modified microbiological methods along with their potential hydrocarbon-oxidizing activities. Studies were performed in polar and temperate marine and limnological environments. It was possible to describe microbial communities and to make conclusions about their state (passive or active) during different seasons. The microbial contribution to the natural self-purification processes of aquatic environments from oil pollution was analyzed too.
  2. Hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria can be considered to be a normal structural and functional component of bacterioplankton, in both, polluted and non-polluted oil contaminated aquatic environments. Hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria include copiotrophic as well as oligotrophic microorganisms, for this reason hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria number is quantitatively related to the abundance of these two groups of heterotrophic microorganisms and to abiotic environmental factors (temperature, concentrations of biogenic nutrients, seasonal changes). But it does not correlate as a rule with the hydrocarbon concentrations in aquatic ecosystems. Hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria number cannot be used for this reason as a quantitative indicator of oil pollution
  3. A modified radiocarbon method is suggested for potential hydrocarbon-oxidizing activity measurements. This permits analyses directly in water samples with short exposure time (not more, then 4 hours) at in situ temperatures and close to ambient hydrocarbons concentrations.
  4. Potential rates of hydrocarbon mineralization measured with 14C-octadecane (PRHMoct) at in situ temperatures varied over a wide ranges in marine and freshwater environments: the lowest annual average level (6 ng l 1 h 1) was observed in near shore waters of the Antarctic Island King George and the highest level (119 ng l 1 h 1) - in Mojaiskoe water storage basin, located in a temperate environment. The PRHMoct values depended on a variety of ecological factors, such as water temperature, nature of oil pollution (chronic or accident), and the trophic status of the environment. The microbial contribution to natural purification processes in high Arctic and in Antarctic environments as well in a freshwater storage basin too, were estimated with special attention to hydrological and hydrochemical situation at each site. It was concluded that in polluted Arctic and sub-Arctic marine areas microbial activities are not strong enough for complete oil pollution degradation. Hence, this lead to oil accumulations in the sediments. Thus, oil biodegradation potential can be much higher in temperate unpolluted freshwater environments, but biogenic elements concentrations and temperature are limiting oil biodegradation processes in summer and winter seasons respectively.
  5. Oil biodegradation processes activities took place at significant levels below ice in polar marine regions and in the water storage basin. These process rates were only slightly lower in winter than in summer in sub-Arctic polluted environments, but PRHMoct in the unpolluted water storage basin was reduced in winter season by a quotient of six or even more.
  6. Alkanes represented the main features of the distribution and their molecular structures were investigated in the seawater samples (1 m depth and a surface microlayer), in fresh water lakes samples, in snow and ice samples collected in Ardley Bay (King George Island) area and in snow and ice samples picked up directly from the central part of island. It was found that terrigenic melt water plays an important role in creation of alkanes pool in the lakes water, whereas seawater contains only a minor quantity of alkanes with terrigenic and technogenic origin. These last two groups of alkanes were probably originated in seawater from allochthonic organic matter transformation processes, which usually take place in any marine environments.
  7. Total bacteria number of Antarctic coastal water were found similar to those of open Southern Ocean waters and to some unpolluted temperate environments. Free-living bacteria dominated among total bacteria and the associate (attached) bacteria fraction does not exceed 20%. These two bacteria groups number showed high level of correlation during the all observations time. Average amounts of copiotrophic, oligotrophic and hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria in nearshore waters of King George Island during austral autumn and winter seasons were closely to those of nearshore seawaters of temperate unpolluted environments. Increases in numbers of viable heterotrophic bacteria were observed concomitantly to increases in hydrocarbon-oxidizing activity in austral winter. Surface water enrichments by bio-available organic matter, which resulted from seasonal phytoplankton and macrophytes decay processes, may have been a reason for this phenomenon.
  8. Effect of accidental oil pollution on structural and functional characteristics of hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacterial communities of uncontaminated mesotrophic water storage basin were investigated by using specially constructed devices for long-time oil exposition in situ. It could be shown that great taxonomic changes in community composition took place, which resulted in predominant bacterial genera replacements and also in drastic increases (more than in ten times) of viable hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria. Bacterioplankton hydrocarbon-oxidizing activity increased too during this time, but not more than to 30%.
  9. The ratio between of the total amount of hydrocarbons (n-alkanes), used by microorganisms for energy and constructive metabolism together, and that used for energy metabolism alone was constant in the freshwater water storage basin environment. This ratio value is 2,81 0,02 (n = 154) and did neither depend on season, nor on oil pollution degree. American microbiologists Atlas and Bartha have observed a similar ratio for oil biodegradation and mineralization processes in marine water samples.
  10. Correlations between viable hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria number and hydrocarbon-oxidizing microbial activity at in situ temperature (measured by 14C-hydrocarbons method in the same water sample) were absent in many cases of fresh and seawaters. Therefore, the estimations of the contribution of microorganisms in natural purification processes of waters from oil hydrocarbons, which were made on the basis of the viable hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria number only, are impossible to use.
  11. Maximal abundances of copiotrophic, oligotrophic and hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria were not always observed in seawater surface microlayers, as considered earlier. Bacterioneuston hydrocarbon-oxidizing activity did not differ from those of bacterioplankton in a lot of cases and may be even lower. The role of bacterioneuston as a most effective biological participant of natural purification processes of aquatic ecosystems from oil pollution needs to be revised.
  12. Bacteria of the genus Rhodococcus frequently isolated from oil polluted and unpolluted marine and freshwater environments showed hydrocarbon-oxidizing acivity. Pseudomonas and Mycobacterium were quite often occurring too, but Acinetobacter and Arthrobacter were relatively rare.

 

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